33
    Image Title  Abstract Category Last Updated
    Adopted Area Plans Adopted area plans with year and ordinance information. Boundary of plans represents time of adoption. Planning 03/31/23 09:21 PM
    Adopted Community Plans Adopted community plans with year and ordinance information. Boundary of plans represents time of adoption. Planning 09/16/20 04:50 PM
    Adopted Natural Resource Plans Natural Resource Plans as adopted Planning 08/13/20 07:07 AM
    Adopted Neighborhood Plans Adopted neighborhood plans shown with ordinance and year. Plan boundary consistent with boundary at time of adoption. Planning 08/18/20 08:18 AM
    Attendance of limited English Proficiency (LEP) Students This layer contains multiple schools where students that have limited English proficiency (LEP) attend. Individuals with limited English proficiency are described as those whose primary language is not English and have a limited ability to read, write, speak, or understand the English language. This dataset was created with data from the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) 2014-2015 Title III NCLB Collection. Planning 08/12/20 10:02 AM
    BLI Model Development Constraints Mapped constraints on housing and employment development used in the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability's Buildable Lands Inventory (BLI) GIS model. Constraints discount housing and employment capacity per the attached table describing the constraints and their impact on housing and employment capacity. All mapping is limited to parcels (right-of-way and rivers is not included). Planning 07/19/23 09:15 AM
    BLI Model Housing/Employment Allocation Allocation of Metro 2035 forecast for the City of Portland to a 250'X250' grid covering the City of Portland area. Forecast is allocated to cells based on development trends, employment densities, and underlying development capacity per the GIS-based buildable lands inventory (BLI) allocation and capacity models. Growth is allocated based on the current proposed comprehensive plan landuse designations and a proposed ("preferred") growth scenario that resulted from the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability's (BPS) 2012 Growth Scenario Analysis. For more information, refer to the 2015 growth scenarios report: https://www.portland.gov/bps/comp-plan/documents/growth-scenarios-report BPS has also produced a technical report describing the GIS-based allocation model: https://www.portland.gov/bps/comp-plan/bli/gis-model-document Planning 05/18/22 04:31 PM
    Centers (Regional, Town and Neighborhood) The official centers boundaries.Document: https://www.portland.gov/bps/planning/comp-plan/documents/urban-design-direction/download Part of the preferred growth scenario, CENTERS provide the primary areas for growth and change in Portland over the next 25 years. They are compact urban places that anchor complete neighborhoods, featuring retail stores and businesses (grocery stores, restaurants, markets, shops, etc.), civic amenities (libraries, schools, community centers, churches, temples, etc.) housing options, health clinics, employment centers and parks or other public gathering places. Centers transition in scale to surrounding lower density neighborhoods using “middle housing” building types – rowhouses, duplexes, triplexes, etc. – at their edges. Targeting new growth in centers and the inner ring districts helps achieve goals of having more Portlanders live in complete neighborhoods, use more mass transit and active transportation, reduce their energy use and mitigate climate change. CENTRAL CITY: The Central City is the region’s premier center with jobs, services, and civicand cultural institutions that support the entire city and region. It includesmajor attractions, amenities and institutions not found anywhere else inthe region, such as Portland State University, Tom McCall Waterfront Park,the Oregon Convention Center, the Portland Art Museum and the region’sTransit Mall. GATEWAY REGIONAL CENTER: Gateway Regional Center is East Portland’s major center, providing the areaand region with civic, employment and community services. It includes theCity’s second largest transit hub outside of downtown and good freewayaccess to regional destinations, such as Portland International Airport. TOWN CENTERS: Town Centers, such as Hollywood or St. Johns, serve broad areas of the City.They are typically anchored by employment centers or institutions andfeature a wide range of commercial and community services and have awide range of housing options. NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS: Neighborhood Centers are smaller centers – frequently areas of focusedactivities along streets – that include a mixture of higher densitycommercial and residential buildings. Because these centers are smaller,there are many more of these citywide, meaning that many Portlanders arelikely to live close to a neighborhood center. Planning 11/02/23 04:35 PM
    Complete Neighborhoods Overlay This layer is an overlay measuring the level of "completeness" of areas within the City of Portland. Completeness is defined by a neighborhood's proximity to various amenities, such as grocery stores, parks and recreation facilities, commercial services, elementary schools, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, and transit. The overlay was generated by calculating the areas where at least five of the seven total "completeness" indicator overlays are present. Planning 08/17/20 11:11 AM
    Complete Neighborhoods Scoring Surface This layer is a scoring surface measuring the level of "completeness" of areas within the City of Portland. Completeness is defined by a neighborhood's proximity to various amenities, such as grocery stores, parks and recreation facilities, commercial services, elementary schools, pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, and transit. The scores were generated by overlaying a series of network service areas and density layers, then adding the scores to arrive at a cumulative, normalized, zero-to-100 index. Planning 07/21/20 05:04 PM
       
      33